Scientists Claim MDMA (and Psychedelics) ‘Safer than Riding’

Scientists


London, UK – Former Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD), David Nutt, was sacked in October 2009 for his controversial comments about cannabis and other illegally classified drugs, including MDMA or Molly (Ecstasy).

He said that drug harm could be equal to harms in other life activities and that there was not much difference between horse-riding addiction (Equine Addiction Syndrome) and ecstasy use. He claimed that equasy was worse than the latter, being accounted for one (1) serious adverse event per 350 exposures compared to only one (1) serious adverse event per 10,000 exposures with ecstasy.

But Prof. Nutt found friends in couple Pål-Ørjan Johansen and Tony Krebs, two Norwegian scientists behind the group EmmaSofia that looks to expand controlled MDMA use. They claimed that using psychedelics, including ecstasy, could wean users off other harmful, illegal substances.

The scientists claimed that the experimental or therapeutic use of psychedelic drugs was safer than consuming legal substances, including alcohol and nicotine.

They also stated that drug ban on ecstasies and magic mushrooms was inconsistent with human rights and said that there was not much evidence of health problems to link with hallucinogens.

They also wrote that based on extensive human experience, it was generally recognized that psychedelic drugs did not elicit compulsive use or addiction and that there was little evidence in the link between the use of such drugs with issues, including chromosome damage, birth defects, toxic effects and long-term mental illness.

In the letter, they also stated that although psychedelic drugs could cause temporary confusion along with emotional anxiety, serious injuries and hospitalizations were extremely rare.

And so to sum it up, psychedelics, then, are not as dangerous as other life activities, including bungee jumping, playing soccer, horse riding and bike riding.

The two scientists also appealed saying that the national and international policies should respect individual rights, especially for those selecting psychedelics (like ecstasy) as personal development, spiritual or cultural activity.

Photo Credit: Newsweek

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1 Comment

  1. Billy

    i totally agree with you, laws are more aggressive towards legal high.

    Reply

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