Your Basic Guide to the Bolivian Torch Cactus

bolivian torch cactus


Trichocereus bridgesii, which is synonymous to Echinopsis lageniformis, is a fast-growing columnar cactus that can branch at its base and can grow from two to five meters tall. It’s known for its night blooming, large white flowers measuring 20 centimeters in diameter and for its scale-covered and black-curled hairs on its tubes and fruits.

Echinopsis lageniformis has a long history of importance in shamanic rituals in the high deserts of Bolivia, where the cactus is also called ‘wachuma’ or ‘achuma.’ It’s valued for its mescaline content, which is very close to San Pedro, while some individual species of Trichocereus bridgesii possess higher mescaline content.
Also called by its popular common name Bolivian Torch cactus, it contains ‘mescaline’ (a psychoactive alkaloid that can induce strong hallucinatory and psychedelic effects). Its mescaline chemical formula is 3, 4, 5-trimethoxyphenethylamine.
Based on reports, the consumption of its flesh can result to strong visuals, including an altered look and perception of the surrounding world. Some people also reported feeling of enchantment and connectivity to Mother Nature and to the whole plant described as a ‘giant organism.’
To unhitch from reality, you may only need 0.3 to 0.4 gram of pure mescaline, but take caution of the dosage and of vomiting (which is only temporary). Natives claim vomiting is due to the cleansing from all the bad elements, including getting rid of the past and getting oneself ready for a new life!
Based on reports, one should refrain from food consumption at least six hours before the planned trip so that the buttons could stay longer in the system, resulting to better absorption of the active substances.
Update: Bolivian torch cactus, from its former name Trichocereus bridgesii, is now called Echinopsis lageniformis because of the new classification for these species. But it may take a while before this word spread and people call it by its new name.
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